Karen Jordan

Enough: Considering the White Space

Photo/KarenJordan

ENOUGH! 

This New Year found me bouncing off my office walls again.

Where do I begin? Do I work on one of those book proposals? Do I need to write another blog post? Do I have a speaking event scheduled this month? Do I need to work on my new website, so I can get that up and going? I don’t know where to start! Help!

Enough! That’s right—enough!

This year, I chose the word—ENOUGH—as my one word to help me get back on track after the holidays.

It may be more accurate to say that this one word—ENOUGH—chose me. It just rolled out of my restless heart and consumed my anxious thoughts awhile back.

At first, I thought it might be an emotional reaction to stress. Now, I’m pretty sure it was a divine revelation to me. To be honest, I’m tired of just bouncing off walls. And I need some white space!

White space on the page. As a writer, I know the importance of white space—the empty space in every document, like the margins and the space between the words, graphs, or pictures.

The wise use of this space can be vital to communicating the writer’s message. But a lack of white space makes the page look too busy, cluttered, and difficult to read. Yet too much white space can make the page look incomplete, as if missing some important elements.

White space of life. As I examine my use of my time and personal resources, I also notice the same important factors apply to the white space of my life. If I try to fill every minute of every day with activities or work, my life becomes too busy or preoccupied with unproductive distractions.

Too much inactivity robs me of my self-worth and my credibility in many areas of life.

How can we determine how much white space to include in our documents?

Never underestimate the power of revisions, editing, and writing tight. Consider the value of constructive criticism. If you’ve discovered a good editor or proofreader, give thanks for this blessing.

How can we discern how much white space to allow in our own lives?

Those who know us best and love us unconditionally may offer healthy opinions at times. But seek your advisor with extreme caution. And you may need to resist some unsolicited criticism that comes your way.

Never underestimate the power of prayer as you consider the white space in your life.

I have much more to say to you, more than you can now bear. But when he, the Spirit of truth, comes, he will guide you into all the truth …” (John 16:12-13 NIV).

I plan to keep you posted on my journey as I explore my one word—ENOUGH—this year. And I hope to hear from you, too.

Have you chosen your one word for 2014? Please share your answer in the “white space” below.

Photo/KarenJordan

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8 thoughts on “Enough: Considering the White Space”

  1. My word is “observe”. I think I need to observe the needs of others, be more aware of how I can use my days to “observe” and act. I know that I could spend my time more wisely and doing things that might be for others rather than what satisfies only me. I am planning to work on this!

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  2. Like you, my one word chose me. After last year’s one word of detox, I was refreshed when I discovered this year it’s favored. Not sure what that will look like — but I’m grateful for God’s provision and call. Now it’s up to me to live as if I believe Him — yes, I am favored!

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    1. Thanks for sharing, Anita! I’m still learning the meaning of “enough” for me this year. I feel like I’ve just skimmed the surface of that term. It’s quite different from my “one words” of the past few years, like focus, rest, blessed. Enough! Happy New Year indeed!

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