The Writing Process Animated

Opening Christmas Presents

Are You Opening Your Gifts to Share With Others?

I don’t know about you, but sometimes a YouTube video offers just the right inspiration to get me motivated. I’m always looking for good writing videos, and I stumbled across this one. It’s fun, but also informative.

The other thing I like about it, is it’s translational. Regardless of what your talent and/or dream, the principles laid out in animation, are applicable. Because no matter how talented we are, if we don’t invest our time, practice our skills, hone our craft, and maintain a disciplined spirit, our gifts will gather dust.

So enjoy — and then get to work.

Are you opening your talents up for the world to enjoy?

Anita Fresh Faith

First Hired Last Fired

Available online, at Barnes and Noble, and select midwest Walmart Stores

Anita Agers-Brooks is a Business and Inspirational Coach, national speaker, Communications Specialist, Certified Personality Trainer, Productivity Expert, and Certified Training Facilitator. Anita is also the author of, First Hired, Last Fired — How to Become Irreplaceable in Any Job Market. Her new book, Getting Through What You Can’t Get Over, releases through Barbour Publishing in April, 2015.

She’s a partner in The Zenith Zone, a business coaching firm. Member of the Christian Writer’s Guild, Toastmasters, and a client of WordServe Literary Group. A graduate of CLASSeminars for Leaders, Speakers, and Authors, a co-founder of The StoryWriting Studio, and speaker on circuit for Stonecroft International Ministries. Anita co-hosts a weekly podcast, Engaging Life and Leadership with Darren Dake, available on iTunes, Stitcher, and other podcast platforms.

Anita is passionate about business with integrity, healthy relationships, and issues of identity. She travels the country teaching others from her personal experiences and research. She believes it’s never too late for a fresh start with fresh faith.

Her favorite pastime is lounging by a river or lake in Missouri, laughing with her husband of thirty years, Ricky.
Follow her FreshFaith blog http://www.anitabrooks.com. You may contact her via website http://www.brooksanita.com/contact/ or email anita@anitabrooks.com.

Ideas for Your Writing Reflections

Take chances, make mistakes, get messy!” (Magic School Bus)

Image/KarenJordan

Do you tend to focus most on your grammar and mechanics when you self-edit? I do.

I want to offer you some questions and ideas that will help to get you out of the “grammar cop” mode and into a more reflective mood.

Writing instructor. I compiled this list of questions as a writing instructor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. I offered these questions to my students to help them in their revision process with their papers.

I’m not sure where I got most of these reflective questions. Writing instructors tend to do a lot of “academic borrowing.” If you teach, you know exactly what I mean.

Professional writer. I also try to remember to ask myself the following questions when I’m reflecting on my own work, so I won’t be so critical of my own work. I tend to be a bit of a self-deprecating perfectionist at times.

I offer the questions and ideas to reflect on your work. I hope it will encourage you to tell the stories that matter most to you. So, let me know if they help you. [You can share your thoughts in the comment section below.]

Consider these questions/ideas as you reflect on your next project:

  1. Who do you imagine might be the audience for this story? (Self, parent, child, writing group, etc.) What details did you include for your audience
  2. What feelings and reactions did you have as you were writing the story? What surprises? What insights? What have you done or what might you do that would capture those feelings, reactions, insights?
  3. What do you think this story means to you? Have you shown what the story means to you in the writing of it? What have you done? Where and what might you do?
  4. Pose questions you wonder about this story or that emerge from this story. What do you need to know in order to complete this story?
  5. How would you revise this story? Write a plan for your revision.
  6. What did you learn about yourself from writing this story? What did you learn about writing from writing this story? What did you learn about writing from reflecting on this story?

What reflective questions do you ask yourself when you revise your work?

Anti-Stress Day

Today, let’s do a little stress-busting. Take a few minutes and think about something pleasant, listen to a favorite song, or take a walk outside. Give yourself permission to take this break. It will refresh you and help you focus on whatever tasks press against you.

I’ll help you out.

IMG_1823

But I will sing of Your power; Yes, I will sing aloud of Your mercy in the morning; For You have been my defense and refuge in the day of my trouble.

Psalm 59:16

Photo: Kathryn Graves

KathrynGraves.Wordpress.com

Blurry Vision

Allergies blur my vision this morning. I’ve dealt with seasonal allergies for years, but usually the symptoms are sneezing and runny nose. This spring the problem is red, burning eyes and blurry vision. Continue reading

Book Review: Under the Desert Sky by Lynne Hartke


In Under the Desert Sky, Lynne Hartke takes her readers with her on a dangerous, yet beautiful, wilderness journey. Continue reading

Writing about Suffering

The following appeared on WordServe Water Cooler in March.

Last night a friend contacted me to tell me about her step-mother’s new diagnosis of stage 4 cancer. This morning I received word a friend was killed in a car wreck. This evening another friend’s granddaughter’s baby is unresponsive following a seizure.  It’s been an emotional day. But one reason these friends talked to me about their issues is that they’ve walked with me through my own. Continue reading

Google Docs: A Helpful Tool for Writers Who Want to Collaborate

I wanted to share this post by Mary Larmoyeux from the WordServe Water Cooler with our StoryWriting Studio friends. Hope you enjoy it! Karen

WordServe Water Cooler

woman on laptop

Years ago Ethan Pope and I wrote a book together called There’s No Place Like Home (Broadman & Holman). Thanks to email, the phone, and a fax machine, we were able to communicate pretty well back them. But not nearly as well as Karen Jordan and I recently did as we worked together on a book proposal. Our collaboration was so much easier because of Google Docs!

What is Google Docs? It’s a free online word processor available to anyone who has a gmail account (which you can get for free). Like most word processing programs, it makes it possible for you to change the appearance of a document: the size of the text, spacing of lines, paragraph styles, headings, etc.

It also allows you to write, edit, and collaborate with others at the same time. And you can upload a Word document and then convert it to a Google document…

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